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Millennials driving new-found optimism in housing market

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Millennials driving new-found optimism in housing market

HOME hunters have singled 2018 out as the year they will finally make a move on the housing market, with Millennials driving the newfound optimism.

A NEW wave of optimism has hit the housing market, with Aussies singling out 2018 as the year they’ll finally chase down their dreams of property ownership — and Millennials are leading the charge.

A national poll has revealed two in five people believe it is a good time to buy a home amid rock bottom interest rates, less competition from foreign buyers and a national cooling in house prices.

Nearly a third of those surveyed plan to buy property this year, whether upsizing, investing, moving to a new area or buying their first home, according to the YouGov Galaxy Poll commissioned by Realestate.com.au.

Millennials have driven much of the new-found optimism, with more than half of those born between 1983 and 2000 planning to pull the trigger on a home purchase.

Millennials are driving new-found optimism in the housing market, a new poll has found.

Millennials are driving new-found optimism in the housing market, a new poll has found.Source:Supplied

Realestate.com.au head of home loans Andrew Russell said the increased optimism was the result of a shift to more stable price movements amid a low interest rate environment.

“With a lot of the recent commentary talking about a slowdown, some buyers may be looking at the market and thinking it will be a good time to buy,” Mr Russell said.

Activity on Realestate.com.au’s home loan platforms showed confidence was at a high among one group in particular, he added.

“Excitement is coming from all categories of buyers, but especially first homebuyers,” Mr Russell said.

 

A national poll has revealed two in five people believe it is a good time to buy a home. Image: AAP/Sam Mooy.

A national poll has revealed two in five people believe it is a good time to buy a home. Image: AAP/Sam Mooy.Source:AAP

“It shows that the dream of home ownership has continued to grow and first homebuyers are more confident they can achieve that dream than perhaps they were in years past.”

Canstar financial services expert Steve Mickenbecker said some homebuyers may had spotted a rare gap in the market.

“Rates are at rock bottom, are likely to stay low for some time and prices are down in some areas so you’ve got a lot of people saying ‘now’s our chance’,” Mr Mickenbecker said.

“Investor participation is down too and there are less foreign buyers in the market so some (house hunters) may feel there’s more space for them.”

Canstar financial services expert Steve Mickenbecker.

Canstar financial services expert Steve Mickenbecker.Source:Supplied

Brisbane couple Matt Brandon, 31, and Alice Tidmarsh, 27, have just bought their first home together and are feeling positive about their decision.

“With interest rates low and the first homeowners grant still available, I think it’s a great time to get in to the market,” Mr Brandon said.

The Millennials have purchased a new townhouse in a residential development in Cannon Hill and will be paying only $25 more a week than they currently are renting.

“Our plan was to buy something new and live in it for one to two years,” Mr Brandon said.

“We would like to build a portfolio in the future.

“This isn’t going to be our last home — it’s a stepping stone.”

Aaron Woolard of Place Estate Agents said about 80 per cent of his clients were Millennials renting in the trendy, Brisbane inner-city suburbs of New Farm and Teneriffe, who were now looking to buy there.

Mr Woolard said Millennials were willing to spend up to $1 million to get into those suburbs, even if it meant taking on a bigger mortgage.

“Most people I talk to want to get into the market and invest wisely,” he said.

“They have drive and ambition to reach their goals, and one of those is property.”

Mr Woolard said he had also noticed an increase in the number of young people wanting to take advantage of the extension of the Queensland First Home Owners’ Grant to June 30 this year.

New research has found a new wave optimism in the housing market in 2018. Photo: Jodie Richter.

New research has found a new wave optimism in the housing market in 2018. Photo: Jodie Richter.Source:News Corp Australia

The research surveyed more than 1000 people across the country under age, gender and regional quotas reflecting ABS demographics estimates.

The survey also included a mix of renters, adult children living with their parents, mortgagees and those who owned their properties outright.

With less barriers to potentially shut buyers out of the market, those with property ambitions said lofty prices would likely be their biggest obstacle.

More than half of respondents (53 per cent) said high prices would be the factor most likely to derail their property goals for the year, followed by not being able to borrow as much as they would like (30 per cent).

To combat those challenges, 84 per cent of Australians were prepared to make sacrifices to get into the market.

That percentage rose to 94 per cent for Millennials, who were more likely than Baby Boomers and Gen Y buyers to forgo luxuries such as a new car, overseas travel and new clothes, among others.

“Young people are determined to get into the housing market,” Mr Russell said. “They realise how much a home loan will impact their lives and they’re willing to make sacrifices.”

WHAT MILLENNIALS WOULD SACRIFICE FOR HOME OWNERSHIP:

— New car 62%

— New clothes 58%

— Eating out/going to movies 56%

— Domestic holidays 50%

— Overseas holidays 68%

— Private health insurance 36%

— No sacrifice 7%

(Source: YouGov Galaxy poll)

Originally published: brisbaneinvestor.com.au

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Opinion

Negative gearing changes will affect us all, mostly for the better

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Negative gearing changes will affect us all, mostly for the better

Don’t have a negatively geared investment property? You’re in good company.

Despite all the talk about negatively geared nurses and property baron police officers, 90 per cent of taxpayers do not use it.

But federal Labor’s policy will still affect you through changes in the housing market and the budget. Here’s what you should know.

Labor’s negative gearing policy will prevent investors from writing off the losses from their property investments against the tax they pay on their wages. This will affect investors buying properties where the rent isn’t enough to cover the cost of operating the property, including any interest payments on the investment loan.

Doesn’t sound like a good investment? Exactly right: negatively gearing a property only makes sense as an investment strategy if you expect that the house will rise significantly in value so you’ll make a decent capital gain when you sell.

The negatively geared investor gets a good deal on tax – they write off their losses in full as they occur but they are only taxed on 50 per cent of their gains when they sell.

Labor’s policy makes the tax deal a little less sweet – losses can only be written off against other investment income, including the proceeds from the property when it is sold. And investors will pay tax on 75 per cent of their gains, at their marginal tax rate.

Future property speculators are unlikely to be popping the champagne corks for Labor’s plan. But other Australians should know that there are a lot of potential upsides from winding back these concessions.

Limiting negative gearing and reducing the capital gains tax discount will substantially boost the budget bottom line. The independent Parliamentary Budget Office estimates Labor’s policy will raise about $32.1 billion over a decade.

Ultimately, the winners from the change are the 89 per cent of nurses, 87 per cent of teachers and all the other hard-working taxpayers who don’t negatively gear. Winding back tax concessions that do not have a strong economic justification means the government can reduce other taxes, provide more services or improve the budget bottom line.

Labor’s plan will reduce house prices, a little. By reducing investor tax breaks, it will reduce investor demand for existing houses.

Assuming the value of the $6.6 trillion property market falls by the entire value of the future stream of tax benefits, there would be price falls in the range of 1 per cent to 2 per cent. Any reduction in competition from investors is a win for first home buyers.

Existing home-owners may be less pleased, especially in light of recent price falls in Sydney and Melbourne. But if they bought their house more than a couple of years ago, chances are they are still comfortably ahead.

And renters need not fear Labor’s policy. Fewer investors does mean fewer rental properties, but those properties don’t disappear – home buyers move in, and so there are also fewer renters.

Negative gearing would affect rents only if it reduced new housing supply. Any effects will be small: around 90 per cent of investment lending is for existing housing, and Labor’s policy leaves in place negative gearing tax write-offs for new homes.

All Australians will benefit from greater stability in the housing market from the proposed change. The existing tax breaks magnify volatility. Negative gearing is most attractive as a tax minimisation strategy when asset prices are rising strongly. So in boom times it feeds investor demand for housing. The opposite is true when prices are stable or falling.

The Reserve Bank, the Productivity Commission and the Murray financial system inquiry have all raised concerns about the effects of the current tax arrangements on financial stability.

Negative gearing would affect rents only if it reduced new housing supply.

 

And for those worried about equity? Negative gearing and capital gains are both skewed towards the better off. Almost 70 per cent of capital gains accrue to those with taxable incomes of more than $130,000, putting them in the top 10 per cent of income earners.

For negative gearing, 38 per cent of the tax benefits flow to this group. But people who negatively gear have lower taxable incomes because they are negatively gearing. If we look at people’s taxable incomes before rental deductions, the top 10 per cent of income earners receive almost 50 per cent of the tax benefit from negative gearing.

So you shouldn’t be surprised to learn that the share of anaesthetists negatively gearing is almost triple that for nurses, and the average tax benefits they receive are around 11 times higher.

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg says aspirational voters should fear Labor’s proposed changes to negative gearing and the capital gains tax.

But for those of us who aspire to a better budget bottom line, a more stable housing market and better opportunities for first home buyers, the policies have plenty to find favour.

 

Source: brisbaneinvestor.com.au

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Opinion

Revealed: The top 10 suburbs to buy a bargain home and reap long-term capital growth returns – but experts warn there’s a catch

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Revealed The top 10 suburbs to buy a bargain home and reap long-term capital growth returns - but experts warn there's a catch

The top 10 suburbs for buying a bargain home have been revealed.

The top two on the list were Norlane and Lovely Banks, two northern suburbs in Geelong, Victoria, while the remaining eight all come from Queensland.

Hollywell in the Gold Coast was named as the best Queensland suburb for an affordable home with long-term capital gain, according to property researcher RiskWise.

The Gold Coast suburb, located 70km south of Brisbane’s CBD, is close to shopping centres, good schools and the beach.

Experts have warned buyers not to confuse a ‘bargain’ property with a ‘cheap’ one.

top 10 suburbs to buy a bargain home and reap long-term capital growth returns

 

The coastal suburb also has many older properties which will have plenty of potential after renovation, according to realestate.com.au.

It has a median house price of $786,614, according to property data researcher CoreLogic.

Mount Ommaney, Sinnamon Park and Gordon Park in Brisbane also make the list, followed by Gaven on the Gold Coast and Doonan in the Sunshine Coast.

Mount Ommaney, an outer suburb located 14 kilometres south-west of Brisbane’s CBD, has a median house price of $852,729.

Sinnamon Park, also located south-west of the Brisbane CBD, has a slightly lower median house price of $747,272.

RiskWise’s list ends with Gordon Park, Stafford Heights and Twin Waters in Queensland.

All the suburbs listed had a median house price of $300,000 to $870,000, with Norlane having the lowest price at $370,931 and Doonan with the highest at $871,189.

RiskWise chief executive Doron Peleg warns the public that a ‘bargain’ house does not necessarily mean buying a ‘cheap’ one.

RiskWise listed down suburbs where capital growth was expected to increase steadily over the years.

The top 10 suburbs to buy a bargain home and reap long-term capital growth returns - but experts warn there's a catch

 

‘It’s more about knowing where to buy for long-term capital gain,’ Mr Peleg said.

‘Sure, there are a lot of well-priced houses out there, but if they are not expected to grow in value down the track, then they really aren’t the best buy.

‘These (Queensland) suburbs, which all enjoyed capital growth of 13 per cent of the past 12 months, are expected to continue to do well as they have a number of things going for them.

‘For starters, they are relatively affordable and all within 100km of Brisbane which means, provided there is a good public transport and road infrastructure, commuting to work is not too much of an issue’.

The top 10 suburbs to buy a bargain home and reap long-term capital growth returns

 

Source: brisbaneinvestor.com.au

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Property Experts Reveal Surprising Areas Investors Are Snapping Up

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Property Experts Reveal Surprising Areas Investors Are Snapping Up

We all know Sydney’s property market has taken hit after hit recently — but there are other lesser-known areas that are experiencing a sudden property boom.

That’s according to Australian real estate experts, who claim that while investors may have deserted Sydney and Melbourne, their attention has turned to other regions across the country.

According to Daniel Walsh of investment buyer’s agency Your Property Your Wealth, investment activity has now firmly shifted to Queensland.

“Net migration has now overtaken Melbourne due to the affordability that Brisbane has to offer,” he explained.

“We’re also seeing rising demand particularly in the housing sector in southeast Queensland where yields are high and jobs are increasing due to the amount of government expenditure around infrastructure which is attracting families to the Sunshine State.

“With Brisbane’s population growth at 1.6 per cent and surrounding areas like Moreton Bay at 2.2 per cent, the Sunshine Coast at 2.7 per cent and Ipswich at 3.7 per cent, we are forecasting that Brisbane will be the standout performer over the next three to five years.”

Realestate.com.au chief economist Nerida Conisbee agreed, saying Sydney investors especially had started to turn their attention north.

“Interest is strong in the Gold Coast across the board although there’s more action on the south side in places like Tugun and Burleigh Heads,” she said, adding there was also a notable trend towards Tasmania, Adelaide and pockets of NSW.

“In Tasmania, most activity is definitely taking place in Hobart, but it has shifted — a lot of the action was in the inner city, but it’s now happening in the middle and outer ring suburbs, as well as in Launceston.

“Tweed Heads and Byron Bay (in NSW) have also had strong price growth at the moment,” she said, adding that in Sydney, trendy inner-city suburbs like Paddington, the premium end of town and areas like Winston Hills in the city’s west were defying the downward trend.

Ms Conisbee said long-neglected Adelaide was also finally booming after recently hitting the highest median house price ever recorded, largely driven by jobs and economic growth off the back of defence contracts, the announcement of the new Australian Space Agency and other investment in the area.

“Inner Adelaide, beachside and the Adelaide Hills tend to have the most activity but there’s also quite a lot of rental demand in low-cost suburbs so we’re expecting to see a bit more investment there in those really cheap suburbs over the next 12 months,” she said.

“There you can get houses for $250,000 so for an investor, it’s a relatively low cost in terms of outlay and the area is seeing really strong rental demand which means you’re more than likely to get tenants, so for investors it’s a really attractive area.”

Mr Walsh said Sydney still remained a solid investment option in the long term — but stressed it was just not the right time to buy in the city due to its market cycle as well as lending constraints.

“While property prices in Sydney have softened by about 9 per cent this year, they are still high, which means it’s not an affordable option for many investors,” he said, noting the city’s high buy-in prices coupled with relatively low rents made the yields quite unattractive.

“At this point in time, the high costs of entry as well as holding costs make it a location that should be avoided — but not forever,” he said.

“The thing is, Sydney is still Sydney, which means that it will always be in demand.

“Its population is forecast to grow by some three million people in the decades ahead, plus it remains our nation’s economic engine room.”

He said the entire NSW economy remained “robust” with unemployment falling to 4.4 per cent last year, with Sydney’s major infrastructure program also proving there was “much to be positive about” in Sydney.

“Sydney homeowners and investors who bought a number of years ago are still well ahead because they chose the optimal time to buy and they remain focused on the future,” he said, adding the optimal time to re-enter the market probably wouldn’t be for at least another year or two.

Source: brisbaneinvestor.com.au

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