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REVEALED: The truth behind Old Woman Island

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STUNNING photographs taken by a drone have shown what is on one of the Sunshine Coast’s most mysterious and iconic landmarks, Old Woman Island.

Property Today real estate agent John Anderson took the photographs with his drone as he always gets asked questions about the island located less than a kilometre off Mudjimba.

It shows the dilapidated ruins of an old building, which begs the question “who lived there”.

One of the last people to own the lease on the island’s wife has revealed a little of its history.

Libby Troy’s late husband, Peter, the Australian surfing legend, used to stay in a “hut” on the island and commute to Marcoola with a tinnie when he owned the lease in the 1980s and 1990s.

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Mrs Troy has also dispelled one of the most common urban myths about the island, that Sean Connery owned it or stayed on it for his honeymoon with Diane Cilento.

The couple owned a unit at Parkyn Parade in Mooloolaba.

But James Bond never made it to the island.

“He never once set foot on the island,” Mrs Troy said.

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“The truth is, a female surfer on the Coast, Kim McKenzie, who had the lease on the shark nets was asked by Connery and his wife, Diane Cilento, to take them out to the island.”

“But the sea was too rough, they never came ashore.”

Peter took the lease on the island as it gave him the perfect opportunity to get the best surf breaks.

“Basically, he wanted it for surfing,” Mrs Troy said.

“He could walk out in the morning and have a surf on the right or have a surf on the left.”

The island had a “hut” on it, which Mrs Troy said had been built by a retired airline pilot, John Sewell who once also owned the lease.

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“He and his wife built a hut out there, from concrete and salt water,” she said.

Apparently it even had a swimming pool on it and vegie patch.

The island wasn’t a cheap holiday home for Mr Troy.

“We paid more leases and fees for Old Woman Island than the person who leased Hamilton Island had to,” she said.

The couple also had to pay council rates and taxes, including fees for garbage collection.

It was just ludicrous, we paid the same rates as those on the Mudjimba shore line.”

Peter used to get annoyed when he would return to his island home and find surfers got into the house.

Mr Anderson’s photos show the scattered remains of the original dwelling.

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Mrs Troy said “you can thank the environment and heritage people for that”.

A decision was made around 2006 to remove the roof on the hut because it had asbestos.

“A chopper came in and took the roof off, which destroyed the house,” she said.

By this time, Mr Troy no longer owned the lease.

He sold it in 1991, but within a year the State Government took the leases back.

“It is an environmental park now,” she said.

“There are a lot of islands that no longer have leases and they don’t do anything to maintain the islands.

“About 12 years after Peter gave over the lease, rangers rang Pete to ask how to get on the island.

“They’d had it for over 10 years and the couldn’t work that out.”

Peter never returned to the island after the no longer had the lease.

“He wasn’t interested in going to it. It was a chapter in his life that was over.”

Sunshine Coast Daily journalist, Bill Hoffman, has had a long association with the island and was involved in securing its inclusion as part of the Maroochy River Conservation Park.

He said it was the subject “of at least two Aboriginal legends”.

One involved two women making a home on the island, where there were midyim berry bushes. When only one of the women could be seen on the island, it became known as Old Woman Island.

The same legend concerned the midyim berry bush – hence ‘midyam’ becoming altered to ‘Mudjimba’.

A second legend interpreted the island as being the head knocked off the top of a warrior, Coolum, which is represented as the flat-topped Mount Coolum about 6km northwards.

 

Originally Published: https://www.sunshinecoastdaily.com.au/

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Home in blue-chip street sells for $4.1 million

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Home in blue-chip street sells for $4.1 million

Home in blue-chip street sells for $4.1 million
Home in blue-chip street sells for $4.1 million
Home in blue-chip street sells for $4.1 million
Home in blue-chip street sells for $4.1 million

Home in blue-chip street sells for $4.1 million

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The canal-front home at 59 Witta Circle, Noosa Heads, sold on April 30 for $4.1 million through Tom Offerman Real Estate.

Source: www.sunshinecoastdaily.com.au

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Queensland’s population hits 5 million people today

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Queensland's population hits 5 million people today
PHOTO: Is this Queensland’s 5 millionth person? Cordy Kerr-Kennedy was born yesterday in Townsville. (ABC News: Mark Jeffery)

Queensland’s population has tipped the 5 million mark today, Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk has told State Parliament.

Ms Palaszczuk said several expectant families were on standby to welcome the state’s five-millionth resident.

“Somewhere today a brand new mum and dad will be eager to meet their new arrival,” she told the house.

“The whole family will want to know: is it a boy or is it a girl? And the doctor will say, ‘congratulations, it’s a Queenslander’.”

Ms Palaszczuk said the two main drivers of the increase were migration growth, particularly from New South Wales, and from 60,000 babies being born in the past year.

Queensland's population hits 5 million people today
PHOTO:
 The state’s five-millionth resident was born today.(ABC North Queensland: Nathalie Fernbach)

“Overseas and interstate migration is up by 50,000 people in the past year, 19,000 came from interstate … more than 12,000, or 230 a week, move from New South Wales to Queensland,” she said.

ABS data also revealed the fastest and largest-growing area in Queensland in 2016-17 was Pimpama on the Gold Coast, which grew by 3,000 people.

Large growth also occurred in Jimboomba on Brisbane’s south side and in North Lakes — a suburb north of the city — which both increased by 2,100 people.

Coomera on the Gold Coast and Springfield Lakes in Ipswich also experienced large growth up 1,400 people.

The State Government’s population counter gives a “synthetic estimate” of the number of current Queenslanders, assuming a total population increase of one person every 6 minutes and 22 seconds.

Earlier this year the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) said Queensland’s population was growing at 1.7 per cent and was projected to tick over to 5 million in May.

ABS data released in March also revealed Brisbane was one of the country’s fastest-growing cities and had increased by 48,000 in 2017, hitting 2.4 million people.

 Queensland's population hits 5 million people today
PHOTO: The ABS estimated Queensland’s population was growing 1.7 per cent a year. (AAP: Dan Peled)

ABS demography director Anthony Grubb said the state’s population had “come a long way” in the last century.

“In 1901 the population was half a million; a tenth of what it is today… it took 37 years to hit the 1 million milestone in 1938 and another 36 years to reach 2 million in 1974,” he said.

But Mr Grubb said population growth “picked up the pace” after that, taking just 18 years to reach 3 million then only another 14 years to hit 4 million in 2006.

Queensland could be leading growth state in future

Population demographer Dr Elin Charles-Edwards said although Queensland is not currently the fastest growing state, it is possible it could top the leader board later down the track.

‘Not in the short-term, but Queensland is coming up off a relatively subdued growth so perhaps we might be entering an era of more rapid growth,” she said.

Dr Charles-Edwards said the challenges that generally come with increased population could be managed in Queensland.

“As long as we keep up and don’t take our eye off the ball we can continue to absorb quite high levels of growth… but really it’s keeping up with the infrastructure that’s the key challenge,” she said.

Dr Charles-Edwards said it was important to note some parts of the state, particularly in western Queensland, were experiencing population decline.

“While the south-east corner is growing and also many Indigenous communities are growing, other parts of the state are shrinking,” she said.

“Perhaps we could do more to encourage people to move outside the south-east corner.

“If we were able to work out some way to decentralise our population, growth a little bit further up into the northern regional centres, I think that would benefit the growth of south-east Queensland.”

Source: brisbaneinvestor.com.au

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APRA to end cap on property investor loan growth

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APRA to end cap on property investor loan growth

APRA is removing the 10 per cent ‘speed limit’ on investor loan growth.
Photo: Louise Kennerley


The banking regulator is axing a 10 per cent speed limit on bank lending to property investors, saying the cap has served its purpose and improved credit standards.

With Sydney house prices falling and credit growth slowing, the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority on Thursday said it would remove the cap for bank boards that could prove they had been following its guidelines on prudent lending.

In late 2014, amid a surge in borrowing by property investors and rapid house price growth, APRA took the rare step of setting a 10 per cent limit on the annual growth in banks’ housing investor loan portfolios.

The measure has rocked the mortgage market in recent years, prompting banks to jack up interest rates for housing investors, and demand borrowers stump up bigger deposits.

But on Thursday, APRA chairman Wayne Byres said it was prepared to remove the measure because there had been an improvement in lending standards and a slowdown in credit growth.

“The temporary benchmark on investor loan growth has served its purpose. Lending growth has moderated, standards have been lifted and oversight has improved,” Mr Byres

Even so, the regulator will retain a separate 2017 policy that requires banks to limit their new interest-only lending to less than 30 per cent of all new home loan approvals.

APRA also said there was “more to do” in improving other aspects of banks’ lending, including how they assessed borrowers’ expenses, their existing debts, and the approval of loans that fell outside of banks’ formal lending policies.

APRA said it expected banks to introduce limits on the proportion of new lending that could be done at “very high” debt-to-income levels.

“In the current environment, APRA supervisors will continue to closely monitor any changes in lending standards,” Mr Byres said.

“The benchmark on interest-only lending will also continue to apply. APRA will consider the need for further changes to its approach as conditions evolve, in consultation with the other members of the Council of Financial Regulators.”

Source: brisbaneinvestor.com.au

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